Merri Creek Management Committee

Congratulations to MCMC Senior Technical Officer, Brian Bainbridge, on winning the 2008 Port Phillip & Western Port Landcare ‘Caring for Community Groups’ Award.

The draft Merri Creek & Environs Strategy will be available for public comment in September. If you are interested in commenting on this Strategy, which guides MCMC and Council actions and works, please email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or phone 9380 8199 and we will let you know the latest. You will also be able to provide your input at public information sessions.

Rural landholders in the Volcanic Plains to the north and west of Melbourne can find practical management tips in a recently published fauna guide book. Nineteen local animals, their habitat requirements and threats are described in the “Wildlife and Habitat Guide for Merriang Landholders”. It includes familiar species such as Yellow-rumped Thornbills (‘Butter-bums’) and Blue-wrens along with rarities like the Growling Grass Frog and the Golden Sun-moth.

Tarnuk means water bowl. These bowls were made out of gnarled growths on the River Red Gums of the Moonee Ponds Creek by the local Gunung Willam Balluk tribe.

The renaming of the Wright Street Retarding Basin to The Tarnuk was to acknowledge the Woiwurung Clan's story of the 'The Great Flood', which is the story about the creation of Port Phillip Bay.

View The Tarnuk in Google Maps.


The changing fortunes of Merri Creek come alive in a new series of displays that demonstrate how far we’ve come in restoring the creek. Images from Merri Creek Management Committee’s treasure trove of records contrast the different eras of the Merri corridor.

If you weren’t around twenty years ago you’ll be surprised at how much the landscape of the Merri has changed since the 1980’s. You can help play a role in its future.