Merri Creek Management Committee

We congratulate our member group, Friends of Merri Creek, on gaining the following grants.  Merri Creek Managment Committee staff assisted the Friends with the grant applications, using our extensive ecological, community and project management knowledge.

$21,635 from Port Phillip & Westernport Catchment Management Authority for the project: Returning and Re-learning: bringing cultural burns and locally rare plants back to Fawkner grasslands. This project aims to return Traditional Owner management knowledge and rare plant species to Bababi Djinanang native grassland by Merri Creek in Fawkner.

$8,800 from Moreland City Council Arts Activation Grant program for the Merri Murnong group's Murnong Harvest 2018 by Merri Creek in Coburg. The Merri Murnong group is a sub-group of the Friends of Merri Creek.

$3,500 from Darebin City Council for the Friends of Merri Park project to plant Climate Change adapted plants in Merri Park Wetland, Northcote. The Friends of Merri Park is a sub-group of the Friends of Merri Creek.

$500 from Parks Victoria for buckets, gloves, geared loppers, flexi-tubs, and safety glasses for woody weed removal at Bababi Marning native grassland near Cooper St, Campbellfield.

After Moreland Council's success in negotiating the purchase of VicRoads' land at McBryde St Fawkner, we are hopeful that VicRoads land at nearby Leonard St in Fawkner will also become permanent open space. This land is an integral part of the Merri Creek habitat and parkland corridor. If it is not acquired by Council for open space, it will be sold off for residential development.  Merri Creek Management Committee congratulates Moreland Council on its decision to pursue acquisition of this land. We share Council's frustration that it has to use ratepayer’s funds to purchase land from another level of government.

Big Clean Up March2018Close to 80 enthusiastic people turned up on a gorgeous sunny Autumn morning (on 17 March) to remove unsightly litter from the banks of the Merri Creek in East Brunswick and Northcote. After a safety induction, donning of gloves and a statement of purpose from the community organiser, Tara Patwardhan-Kalra, the volunteers got down to business. Because there was such a great turn-out of volunteers, a large area of the creek’s bank, the nearby Merri Park wetlands, and surrounding stormwater drains, were literally picked clean of litter! In four hours over 40 large bags of rubbish were collected, and bundled up neatly ready for collection by Council. About a quarter of this could have been recycled.

Map of Spry St Coburg landTimely action by Moreland Council has saved two critical parcels of land next to Merri Creek from residential development.  Excellent campaigns from the local community, Friends of Merri Creek (FoMC), Merri Creek Management Committee (MCMC) and in Fawkner, the Fawkner Residents Association led to this result.

Council negotiated a successful offer for a parcel of VicRoads land at McBryde St Fawkner. This significant piece of land abuts Merri Creek and has been an effective part of the open space corridor for many years.  Council also made a successful purchase on the open market of a prominent block of private land at 2 Spry St Coburg North, next to the Merri Creek Trail and Merri Creek.  

Aitken Milky Beauty Heads

Aitken Creek in Craigieburn was a hive of activity as Merri Creek Management Committee (MCMC) helped to implement the ‘Aitken Creek’s Living Pathways’ project in 2018. This Friends of Merri Creek project has established pathways for blue banded bees to pollinate endangered Matted Flax Lilys. We invite you to learn about and help take care of this magnificent tributary of Merri Creek habitat corridor. You can use the new interactive on line map to tour the creek from home. View the map in the browser on any web-connected device. Or download the mobile app from the Google Play Store with your Android device.

Brian 2017After almost 21 years, Brian Bainbridge, MCMC's Ecological Restoration Planner, has left us for a position as Biodiversity Officer with Hepburn Shire Council. This move enables Brian to work closer to where he now lives. Brian has amazing skills in identifying fauna and flora and is excellent at planning, analysing and communicating ecological restoration projects. He has discovered a number of rare species at Merri Creek sites, including Golden Sun Moths. However we haven't lost Brian's valuable contribution altogether as he's still working for us one day a week, helping out with a hand-over to Michael Longmore.

Galada Tamboore Chris Clarke smallIf you would like to help protect Merri Creek beyond your lifetime, please consider making a gift in your will to Merri Creek Management Committee. Your gift, large or small, will fund important projects which may not otherwise be possible.
We understand that making your will is a very personal matter and all bequest information is held in the utmost confidence.
If you would like to discuss leaving a bequest to the Merri Creek, please contact Luisa Macmillan (03) 9380 8199 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. You'll find key information about bequests in our bequests facts document.

Leaf and stem cuttings for propagationThe native White Elderberry, cousin of Europe’s Black Elderberry, is now a rare plant along the Merri Creek. The European plant has a rich folklore and a new MCMC project aims to secure the local plant’s future. Read more.

Murnong EncountersDuring July 2017’s NAIDOC Week, Wurundjeri Elder Aunty Di Kerr provided a Welcome to Country for the big group of 60 people who came to a special Murnong Encounters evening put on by MECCARG (Merri and Edgars Creeks Confluence Area Restoration Group).  Murnong, or PlainsYam Daisy, was a staple food for Wurundjeri people and Aunty Di has been closely involved in the local MECCARG project to revive and celebrate this vital food plant.

The MECCARG community was very proud to have Dr Beth Gott (on left in photo) lead the evening with a detailed account of Murnong, based on her long and distinguished career as an ethnobotanist. 

Yakai Barring gardenThis flourishing indigenous garden, planted in 2015 at Brunswick North West Primary School and named Yakai Barring in Woiwurrung language (meaning ‘surprise track’), is full of educational opportunities. After two years growth, the Poa labillardieri  (Common Tussock-grass) was quite abundant, so in May 2017 students in Grades 1 & 2 harvested it. They noted that the soft flower heads had already dropped their seed and could understand how Wurundjeri got clues from nature to know the seasons and the right time of year to collect seed.  Later, the 125 students examined water bugs, gazed at toy dalai wurrung (playtypus) and iuk (short finned eel) and made detailed observational drawings.