Merri Creek Management Committee

Cool cultural burn at Bababi Djinanang July 2019Under the guidance of Uncle Dave Wandin and the Wurundjeri Tribe Council’s Narrap Team,⁠ Merri Creek Management Committee (MCMC) staff participated in their first cool burn at Bababi Djinanang Grassland, Fawkner in mid-July 2019. Cool burns, also known as cultural burns, are conducted using traditional Indigenous land management techniques.

They differ from our usual ecological burns which are normally done in mid-autumn, with a hot fire which moves fast due to the largely dried out vegetation. In contrast, cool burns are done following heavy rains, when the soil is wet and lots of green vegetation has resprouted. The cool fire moves slowly and burns a patchy mosaic, giving wildlife time to move to safe ground.

Corporate group picIn 2019, staff from Intrepid Group participated in three different hands-on activities . After twice handweeding in East Brunswick earlier in the year, they planted over 500 small indigenous flowering plants (forbes) at Moomba Park, Fawkner in late July (photo left). These plants will help to link habitat and create a seed source for future rare plants along the Merri.

CSL Ltd staff planted shrubs and removed woody weeds at Galada Tamboore in early July 2019

as part of a bird habitat creation project funded MCMC's Merri Creek Environment Fund. They also helped out last year at a planting near Merri Creek in Fawkner, for a project funded by Melbourne Water.

Our sincere thanks to the Intrepid and CSL staff for their efforts  If your corporate group would like to volunteer with MCMC, check out the information here and get in touch.

Litter tracking studentsMerri Creek Management Committee (MCMC) teamed up with RMIT University and Melbourne Water on 31 May to present a litter education session for 18 lucky Year 3 Antonine College students. RMIT Scientist, Dr Kavitha Chinathamby, helped the students release plastic bottles fitted with GPS 'trackers'. The GPS-enabled plastic bottles to simulate litter that comes into Merri Creek, usually from street stormwater drains, and is subsequently washed into Port Phillip Bay. Each GPS-enabled device sends signals pinpointing its location at defined time intervals so the litter voyages can be tracked. You can track the Merri Creek bottles and other bottles in waterways around Melbourne HERE. All plastic bottles will be rounded up and removed at the end of the project.

14 Group on MCCC bridgeMerri Creek Management Committee (MCMC) celebrated its 30th Anniversary with an afternoon walking tour along Merri Creek on 23rd May 2019.   

First stop was near CERES in Brunswick East, where the MCMC President, Ann McGregor, talked about some of the first plantings along Merri Creek in the 1970s. Then people walked downstream along the Northcote side of the Merri where Geoff Mabett talked about the  transformative works of the Northern Waterways Group in creating Merri Park in the late 1980s. The group was photographed on the footbridge between Merri Park and Sumner Park.

Powerful Owl upstream of St Georges Rd 7 5 19 AnnMcGregorOur President, Ann McGregor, photographed this Powerful Owl in a Peppercorn tree overlooking Merri Creek shared path in Fitzroy North, in May 2019. We believe this is the first time a Powerful Owl has been recorded along the Merri in the inner suburbs. 

Please let us know of your own wildlife sightings along Merri Creek by using the reporting form on our website.  A photo is of great help. All significant confirmed sightings are forwarded to appropriate databases such as the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas.